Tag Archives: safety

Washington Ave. Flyover – A Call for Change

Washington Ave. Flyover – A Call for Change – In fall 2012, the long awaited “Flyover” to route through motor vehicle traffic from Washington Ave. to the Washington Ave. Extension was completed. This and the accompanying series of traffic circles on Fuller Rd. were clearly designed under an “all cars-all the time” philosophy. These means that people on bicycles who want to travel on Washington Ave. and its Extension, on Fuller Rd., on the University at Albany’s “purple path,” and on the Six-Mile Trail must be in the Advanced/Experienced “Strong and Fearless” or “Enthused and confident” 1 percent category.

The following letter calls for the New York State Department of Transportation to revisit this area and to modify it to accommodate people on bicycles.

Here are some earlier rider assessments.

++++++ LETTER ++++++

Albany Bicycle Coalition, Inc.

September 4, 2018

RE: Washington Ave. Flyover at Fuller Rd.

Sam Zhou, PE – Director
Region One – NYS Department of Transportation
50 Wolf Road
Albany, NY 12232

Dear Mr. Zhou:

This is to seek your assistance in clarifying safety concerns of the Albany Bicycle Coalition and of people on bicycles who use Washington Ave., Washington Ave. Extension, and Fuller Rd.

Because of our advocacy role in the region, we receive questions and comments about riding conditions. One common area of concern is navigation of the Fuller Rd. traffic circles, the Fuller Rd./Washington Ave. intersections, the Flyover, and bicycle travel on Washington Ave. Extension. As you are aware, fear of riding in traffic is the single, major impediment to bicycle travel. This is nowhere more apparent than in those spaces where motor vehicle movement was the paramount design feature.
In response to these concerns, we formed a study group to develop questions and recommendations about these specific roadways. We are at the point where we need advice from you or members of your staff on what are feasible treatments for this Washington Ave.-Fuller Rd. area.

I am asking that you arrange for our group to meet with you or staff for a learning session where we can articulate our concerns and our ideas. I am enclosing some specific ideas that result from our site visits and deliberations. Because several of our members work during the day, it would be helpful to have such a meeting at the end of or after the businesses day. This meeting could be augmented by site visit(s).

We look forward to hearing from you.

++++++ Attachment ++++++

ALBANY BICYCLE COALITION, INC.

SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS
ON FULLER RD./WASHINGTON AVE. FLYOVER
September 2018

  1. Bicycles Ahead Signage – Place several signs near the merge areas on both Fuller Rd. and Washington Ave. (Share the Road, Bicycles In Lane, etc.). Of particular emphasis is the on ramp to westbound Washington Ave. Extension from southbound Fuller Rd.
  2. Bicycle Lane Markings – Install conventional bicycle lane pavement markings on the Washington Ave. “flyover” shoulders to designate clearly where the people on bicycles should be riding. These markings will instruct both cyclists and people in cars.
  3. Bicycle Lane – Install “Bicycle Lane” signs near and at both entrances to the Flyover.
  4. Activation Alert – Install bicycle-activated sensors to illuminate a bicycle symbol sign on the Fuller Rd. exit onto westbound Washington Ave. These will alert motorists when cyclists are present. Bicycles would activate these as they pass over the correct place on the shoulder (bicycle lane) without stopping. (A less effective alternative is MUTCD-compliant flashing LED edge-light signs with high-intensity LEDs.)
  5. Intersection Crossing Pavement Marking on Westbound Washington Ave. – Install crossing markings (e.g., dotted green and white) in the median to guide people on bicycles from the proposed bicycle lane on westbound Washington Ave. to the proper lane to continue west on Washington Ave. Extension. This will (1) alert people in cars to the presence of bicycles and (2) guide cyclists away from the tail of the merge lane (where they would risk conflicts with both the through motor vehicles and the merging motor vehicles).
  6. Shared Lanes Markings – Install Shared Lanes pavement markings on all lanes leading to and from the flyover.
  7. Walk Your Bicycle Assist – Install enhanced walking instructions for those people on bicycles who prefer not to navigate by bicycle the multiple traffic circles to access the Six-Mile Trail, Washington Ave., the University at Albany campus, or Fuller Rd. Ensure continued diligence to maintain and clean the sidewalks, curb cuts, and pavement markings/signage.

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Filed under Activisim, Albany-Colonie Connector, Fuller Rd., NYS DOT, Washington Ave.

Albany’s 10th Annual Ride of Silence

The Albany Bicycle Coalition held the Ride of Silence on Wednesday, May 17. Twenty-six riders plus an Albany Police Department escort visited four ghost bike sites in the City of Albany and Colonie – Jose Perez, Diva De Loayza, Nicholas Ricicihi, and Paul Merges.  We started from the Boat Launch area, Albany Corning Preserve and W. Capitol Park on Washington Ave. At each site, we placed fresh flowers.

At Diva De Loayza’s ghost bike site (corner of Western Ave., Homestead we read the names of those who have been killed since 2000 while riding their bicycles. We were honored to hear from family members of three of the fallen riders.

Ride of Silence – 10 Years – The national Ride of Silence organization has authorized ROS 10 yr logo 2017ABC’s using the 10-Year Anniversary logo since we are on record as having conducted the Albany ROS each year for that period.  Going back those 10 years from this year’s ride date (5/17), we have lost John J. Cummings (1/27/16), Robert Agne, Stephen Nolan, Brian Bailey, Matthew Ratelle, and Paul J. Merges (11/24/12).  That’s 1 every 20 months.  Four of the six died by virtue of bad behavior by people in cars.  See for complete annotated list and photos at – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/2017/05/01/ride-of-silence/

This year, thanks to Alert Rider Anthony, we had tags to give to those who saw our ride. Each tag had the ROS logo and a few words on the rationale for the ride.

 

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Filed under Activisim, Ride of Silence

Washington Ave. – Watcha’ Gonna Do?

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The recent reduction in speed limits on Washington Ave. from Brevator to Fuller Rd. (from 40 to 30 mph) and from Fuller to Rt. 155/Karner Rd. (from 55 to 45) invites immediate reconsideration of the street for use by people on bicycles and for increased safety for all road users. Opening almost 4 miles on Washington Ave. for all users would provide a major commuter and recreational route and would connect the City of Albany to Schenectady and the suburbs with benefits to all. Specifically for people on bicycles, a traffic-calmed Washington Ave. would connect to the Six Mile Waterworks Park trail (and thence to Lincoln Ave./Rapp Rd. and then to Central Ave.) allowing riders to bypass the dangerous Wolf Rd. – Central Ave. area.

To support this approach, we need only note that, although the official speed is now lower, the configuration of the road and the clear message it sends to people in cars is – 40, 45, 50, 55, 60 mph – it’s all good. The entire Albany Police Department could not “police” speeders on Washington Ave. The simple solution is to abandon this configuration of wide lanes with negligible build up or greenery near the roadway, wide shoulders, and 4 lanes. We can send a “complete streets message” by taking advantage of these wide shoulders and extra wide motor vehicle travel lanes to provide 11-foot travel lanes and bicycle lanes on each side from Manning Blvd. to 155/Karner Rd..

A positive feature of Washington Ave. is that it lies under only one jurisdiction – the City of Albany – and is not a New York State numbered route. This means that it is unnecessary to navigate many levels of government to make these changes.

Another aspect of Washington Ave. is the “trail to nowhere” that starts on the sidewalk at the Fuller Rd. underpass/traffic circle on the south side of Washington Ave. (2.4 miles from Manning Blvd.). This multi-use path runs to an abrupt end at the Collin’s Circle entrance to the University at Albany. On its way there, the multi-use path crosses one campus access road (W. University Dr.) with no bicycle accommodations but with pedestrian crossing signals. (With Albany’s “right turn on red after pause ’rule’,” all these University at Albany entries are high-risk crossings.)

There is unencumbered real estate for continuation of this path from Collins Circle to the New York State Harriman Campus western border near the traffic lights controlling access to the office complex at 1365-1367-1375 Washington Ave. (3.8 miles from the start of the multiuse path at Fuller Rd.). Possibly, all that is needed is straightforward signaled crossover for pedestrians and for people on bicycles (to switch between the multi-use path and the bicycle lanes).

Here is a look at Washington Ave. (photos dated 4-9-17):

  1. (photo above) Super Mirage at Fuller at Wash Ave
  2. (photo above)Fuller at Wash Ave – Looking east
  3. Aspen & Quad Wash Ave-UA – Looking east
  4. Collins Cir Entrance Wash Ave-UA – Looking east
  5. Looking toward new Path Wash Ave-UA – Looking east
  6. E Bridge over Ring Rd Wash Ave-UA
  7. Exit to Patroon Creek and Ring Rd Wash Ave-UA
  8. Bridge Over Rt 85 at Jermain St Wash Ave-UA – Looking east
  9. Exit to Rt 85 from Wash Ave-UA
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3. Aspen & Quad – Looking East

 

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5. New Path Route East?

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6. East Bridge Over NYS Campus Ring Rd.

 

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7. Exit to Patroon Creek and NYS Campus Ring Road

 

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8. Bridge Over Rt 85 at Jermain St.

 

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9. Exit to Rt 85 from Washington Ave.

 

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Filed under ABChallenge-2017, Bike Lanes

Pay Attention!

Everyone knows the “ABC Quick Check” – Air (tread or sidewall damage), brakes (pads and cables adjusted), Cranks (loose?)/Chain (lubed?)/Cassette (worn?), and QUICK Releases (both wheels and brakes). The ABC Quick Check can come in many variations, but the preceding is pretty much it.

But time passes, wear occurs, the mind wanders, the B-12 wears off, etc.

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Standing around one day, a fortunate glance showed that the “A” in “A,B,C” was totally overlooked when it came to the rear tire. In two places, the tread was worn through and cracked with the tire casing fabric showing through. YIKES! In the case of this particular bicycle, there was not even the excuse of fenders blocking view of the tread…

abc-quick-check-3-on-1

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Filed under Bike Tech

Resolutions for People on Bicycles

Resolutions for people on bicycles who want to make cycling safer for all by promoting a positive image of cycling …

  • I will – Smile and say “good morning,” “good afternoon,” etc. to everyone I meet while riding.
  • I will – Remember that the one certain way to increase safety for people on bicycles is to ride my bicycle as often as I can. All the bicycle lanes, tickets, smart traffic lights, “share the road signs,” blinkie lights, and reflective clothing will do little if not accompanied by MORE PEOPLE riding MORE OFTEN – so that all road users get used to each other being on the street.
  • I will – Shop locally at locally owned businesses who hire local people and pay a fair wage.
  • I will – Obey the traffic law. I will stop for signs and signals especially when people in cars or on foot can see me, and I will stay off the sidewalks.
  • I will – Lube my chain and check my tires (for wear and correct air pressure).
  • I will – Check that my brakes work (lever is a thumb’s distance or more from the handle bars when full “on”) and the pads contact the wheel rim braking surface.
  • I will – Be deferential to all pedestrians no matter how crazily they act
  • I will – Speak out on behalf of people on bicycles in a polite and non-confrontational manner.
  • I will – Signal my stops, scan and signal my turns, and make eye contact with people in cars and on foot.
  • I will – Speak out and write in on issues facing cycling. I will keep up to date on developments that affect safe use of the streets by people on bicycles.
  • I will – Support my local bike rescue and bicycle shops. I will buy on the internet only when my bicycle shop does not stock or cannot order what I need.
  • I will – Wave and smile to those in cars who are bothered by my presence on a bicycle on my streets (no “one finger waves,” s.v.p.)
  • I will – Be Kind.bicycle-friendly-america-fall-2016-001

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Filed under Activisim, Article, Shop Local, Support the Cause