Bicycle Lanes in the City of Albany

As part of the Northern Blvd.-Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lane network, an additional 0.3 miles of buffered lanes are now open on Shaker Rd. (It’s “Albany-Shaker Rd.” in the Town of Colonie and “Shaker Rd.” in Albany.)

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The 6 ft. lanes have a 3-ft painted buffer. These facilitate the ride down (or up) the hill by Memorial Hospital to and from Broadway. The lanes also should reduce petrovehicles speeds on this busy route. Eventually the lanes will continue the additional 0.5 miles to Broadway.

Alb-Shaker BL at Northern Blvd 8-11-19 (3).JPG

Below is an inventory of installed bicycle lanes in the City of Albany. Please report any change/corrections to lorenzworden@gmail.com

Madison Ave.

  • Partridge St. – Allen St.     0.4 (2016 completion, no buffer)
  • Partridge St. – Willet St.     0.9 (2018 completion, no buffer)
  •            SUBTOTAL               1.4 (measurement error – Total = 1.4)

 

  • Clinton Ave.                       1.7 (Manning Sq. to Ten Broeck St., no buffer)
  • Northern Blvd.                  0.9 (McCrossin Ave./Pennsylvania Ave. to Van Rensselaer. no buffer)
  • Ten Broeck St.                   0.2 (Clinton Ave. to Livingston Ave., no buffer)
  • Albany-Shaker Rd.           0.3 (Northern Blvd. to Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 (2019 completion, buffered))
  •             SUBTOTAL           3.1

 TOTAL (installed)   4.5 (2019)

 Bicycle Network – The bicycle lane-to-lane connections are as follows:

  • Ten Broeck Ave. and Clinton Ave. – Total mileage of 1.7 + 0.2 = 1.9 mi.
  • Northern Blvd. and Albany-Shaker Rd. – Total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 = 1.2 mi. (This also ties in directly to the 1.5 miles of Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lanes which are mostly in Menands (for a total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 + 1.5 = 2.7 mi. See – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/2017/07/08/89398/ )

The Madison Ave. bicycle lanes are isolated.

Albany Bicycle Master Plan – The City of Albany approved its Bicycle Master Plan in December 2009. It called for a 20-year completion period as follows: “This bicycle master plan identifies a bikeway network to be phased in over the next 20 years,” (SOURCE: Pg. ES3, https://albany2030.org/files/City%20of%20Albany%20Bicycle%20Master%20Plan.pdf ) In the first 10 years, the city installed 4.5 miles of bicycle lanes for an average of 0.45 per year. At this rate, the City of Albany will have 9.0 miles of bicycle lanes at the end of the 20-years.

By comparison, the City of Troy’s Uncle Sam Trail is 6.3 miles in a combination of shared lanes, cycle tracks, bicycle lanes, and off-road multiuse paths. Troy plans to close the 0.8-mile gap for the “Hudson River Promenade,” now under construction, in 2021.

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Big Doin’s on New Scotland Ave

The Setting – New Scotland Ave. has four business districts: way out there (Whitehall-Krumkill – Stewarts, Russian gasoline), mid-town (Manning-West Lawrence – post office, bank, booze, RX, etc.) lower (Ontario-Quail – gas, bank, Stewarts, barber, booze), and lower-lower (Holland-Madison Ave. – banks, RX, eats, booze).

The first two will be addressed as part of the New Scotland Ave. Corridor Study. Lower-lower is in a state of constant flux because of the unending Albany Medical Center Hospital and residential building spree.

The Changes – The lower district (Ontario-Quail) is the “walkable neighborhood” section with several dining establishments, ice cream, banking, etc. It is currently being rebuilt to provide pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, space for patio tables for the restaurants, and notably an effort to rationalize the New Scotland Ave. – Quail St. intersection. There are now “bumpouts” on both sides of Quail. They may encourage people in cars to slow down (we hope) and to enter and leave New Scotland Ave. at a closer to a 90-degree angle. This is opposed to the swooping turns previously favored by the City of Albany’s street designers (e.g., Willet and Madison Ave., New Scotland Ave. and Krumkill, New Scotland Ave. and Buckingham/Lenox, New Scotland Ave. and Euclid, and, Lark St. and Madison Ave.).

The walk area curb-to-curb across Quail St. is now 61 feet. The visual width for people in cars coming south on Quail is somewhat less at around 45 ft due to the bumpouts. Back from the crossing, the street is about 32 ft wide with some parking and two motor vehicle travel lanes. Once the lane markings are in, we’ll have a better idea on the impact on people in cars, on busses, on foot, and on bicycles.

Photos:

  1. Bump out on east side of Quail
  2. Bump out on west side of Quail
  3. New intersection layout viewed from New Scotland Ave.
  4. New intersection from New Scotland Ave. – looks plenty wide and a little scary for people walking. Is it better?
  5. The sprint zone – 61 feet across.
  6. Looking west on New Scotland Ave. with new sidewalk configuration. Once parking is added, looks like bicycle lanes will be impossible.

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Filed under City Review, Road Diet - Traffic Calming

Park Tool – #1

Sequence:

 7/2/19 – Park Tool PFP-4 (floor pump) malfunctions

7/3 (4:34 AM) – Email Park tool: “When I use on a Schrader valve, air comes out of the presta valve opening. Thus, no inflation takes place. What part do I need?”

7/3 (9:31 AM) – Email from Park Tool (St. Paul is a bit behind time-zone wise): “Hi —– It sounds like an issue in the head of the pump. We will send a replacement head. Thanks. Dan”

7/3 (2:29 PM) – Email from Park Tool with shipping notice for 3-day delivery.

7/8 – Not only the new head but complete head and hose arrive.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7/11 – Switch head and hose – 30-45 seconds. Problem solved.

More …

Park Tool https://www.parktool.com/ offers a complete line of top-quality bicycle tools. Park Tool hosts a “fix it school” at – https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help where a search tool leads one to videos on all manner of bicycle service.

While the PFP-4 was laid up, the 1971 Schwinn pump came out of semi-retirement after continuous use from 1971-2007. This came from Klarsfeld Cycles – now CK Cycleshttps://ckcycles.com/ . Charles Klarsfeld, “CK,” founded the business in 1905.

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Filed under bicycle shops, Editorial, Product Review

Bicycle Warning Signs at Washington Ave. and Fuller Rd.

Bicycle Warning Signs – NYS Department of Transportation at Washington Ave. and Fuller Rd. ~ Photos 6/21/19 vs. Google Street View, Various Dates. 

Sign Present – Checked with Google Maps Street View July 2018

  • DOT Signs Flyover NORTH BOUND on Fuller Rd South of Wash Ave Rd 6-21-19 (1) – Wide View OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
  • DOT Signs Flyover NORTH BOUND on Fuller Rd South of Wash Ave Rd 6-21-19 (2) – Close up OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Sign Present – Checked with Google Maps Street View August 2018

  • DOT Signs Flyover NORTHBOUND Fuller Rd at exit from Wash Ave 6-21-19 (1) – Going under I-90
  • DOT Signs Flyover NORTHBOUND Fuller Rd at exit from Wash Ave 6-21-19 (2) – Going under I-90
  • DOT Signs Flyover NORTHBOUND Fuller Rd at exit from Wash Ave 6-21-19 (3) – Going under I-90

Sign Absent – Checked with Google Maps Street View September 2016

  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND TO WASH AVE EXT from Fuller Rd 6-21-19 (1)
  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND TO WASH AVE EXT from Fuller Rd 6-21-19 (2)
  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND TO WASH AVE EXT from Fuller Rd 6-21-19 (3)

Sign Absent – Checked with Google Maps Street View August 2018

  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND Wash Ave at I-90 on-off ramp 6-21-19 (1)
  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND Wash Ave at I-90 on-off ramp 6-21-19 (2)
  • DOT Signs Flyover WESTBOUND Wash Ave at I-90 on-off ramp 6-21-19 (3)

 

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Filed under Activisim, NYS DOT, safety, Washington Ave.

Albany Ride of Silence – 5/15/19

Twenty-one riders commemorated the deaths of bicycle riders in the area by participating in Albany Bicycle Coalition’s 12th annual Ride of Silence.

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As in years past, we stopped for a remembrance at each of the area ghost bike sites. At each site, we had a sign with the first name, a bicycle symbol, and year. We affixed a bouquet of flowers at each site.

When we arrived at the Diva (Diva De Loayza, June 6, 2007, age 40, killed by car) ghost bike site at Western and Homestead Aves., we stopped to acknowledge all the deceased area riders. DSCF9955

 

We were honored to be joined by the family of Roger Sawyer (October 19, 2017, age 30, run down by SUV, Washington Ave. Ext.). DSCF9969Rodger’s mother relayed her frustrations in attempting to gather data from local agencies on the death of her son. Contrary to Albany Police Department and Times Union reports, the motor vehicle operator behaved and had background issues that contributed to Roger’s death and that were not known beforehand.

Susan, daughter of Alan Fairbanks (October 29, 2006, age 72, hit by car/died, Rt. 5-S at bicycle path, Rotterdam) and her friend joined us as they have for many years. A rider spoke in honor of Robert F. Zayhowski (July 16, 2000, age 43, killed by drunken driver/SUV, Rt. 66, Sand Lake). Another spoke in honor of his friend who was struck, paralyzed, and eventually died of his injuries. We took turns reading off the names of the other area fatalities with a few words on the circumstances of their deaths.

We also visited the sites of the deaths of Edston J. Kirnon (July 22, 2017, age 42, collided with side of CDTA bus, N. Pearl St.), Nicholas Richichi (October 19, 2007, age 53, killed by motor coach, Fuller Rd., Colonie), Jose Perez (August 3, 2006, age 60, killed by SUV, Broadway at Quay St., Albany), and Paul J. Merges, Jr. (November 24, 2012, age 45, killed by drunken driver, Manning Blvd. & Roosevelt St.).

What is the Ride of Silence? – This ride commemorates those who were killed or injured while riding their bicycles. The ride reminds all road users to be careful and considerate of their fellow travelers. The Ride of Silence is an international movement that the Albany Bicycle Coalition has supported by hosting the Albany ride since 2007. See – http://www.rideofsilence.org/main.php .

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