Category Archives: City Review

Bicycle Lanes in the City of Albany

As part of the Northern Blvd.-Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lane network, an additional 0.3 miles of buffered lanes are now open on Shaker Rd. (It’s “Albany-Shaker Rd.” in the Town of Colonie and “Shaker Rd.” in Albany.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The 6 ft. lanes have a 3-ft painted buffer. These facilitate the ride down (or up) the hill by Memorial Hospital to and from Broadway. The lanes also should reduce petrovehicles speeds on this busy route. Eventually the lanes will continue the additional 0.5 miles to Broadway.

Alb-Shaker BL at Northern Blvd 8-11-19 (3).JPG

Below is an inventory of installed bicycle lanes in the City of Albany. Please report any change/corrections to lorenzworden@gmail.com

Madison Ave.

  • Partridge St. – Allen St.     0.4 (2016 completion, no buffer)
  • Partridge St. – Willet St.     0.9 (2018 completion, no buffer)
  •            SUBTOTAL               1.4 (measurement error – Total = 1.4)

 

  • Clinton Ave.                       1.7 (Manning Sq. to Ten Broeck St., no buffer)
  • Northern Blvd.                  0.9 (McCrossin Ave./Pennsylvania Ave. to Van Rensselaer. no buffer)
  • Ten Broeck St.                   0.2 (Clinton Ave. to Livingston Ave., no buffer)
  • Albany-Shaker Rd.           0.3 (Northern Blvd. to Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 (2019 completion, buffered))
  •             SUBTOTAL           3.1

 TOTAL (installed)   4.5 (2019)

 Bicycle Network – The bicycle lane-to-lane connections are as follows:

  • Ten Broeck Ave. and Clinton Ave. – Total mileage of 1.7 + 0.2 = 1.9 mi.
  • Northern Blvd. and Albany-Shaker Rd. – Total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 = 1.2 mi. (This also ties in directly to the 1.5 miles of Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lanes which are mostly in Menands (for a total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 + 1.5 = 2.7 mi. See – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/2017/07/08/89398/ )

The Madison Ave. bicycle lanes are isolated.

Albany Bicycle Master Plan – The City of Albany approved its Bicycle Master Plan in December 2009. It called for a 20-year completion period as follows: “This bicycle master plan identifies a bikeway network to be phased in over the next 20 years,” (SOURCE: Pg. ES3, https://albany2030.org/files/City%20of%20Albany%20Bicycle%20Master%20Plan.pdf ) In the first 10 years, the city installed 4.5 miles of bicycle lanes for an average of 0.45 per year. At this rate, the City of Albany will have 9.0 miles of bicycle lanes at the end of the 20-years.

By comparison, the City of Troy’s Uncle Sam Trail is 6.3 miles in a combination of shared lanes, cycle tracks, bicycle lanes, and off-road multiuse paths. Troy plans to close the 0.8-mile gap for the “Hudson River Promenade,” now under construction, in 2021.

++++++

Leave a comment

Filed under Bike Lanes, City Review

Big Doin’s on New Scotland Ave

The Setting – New Scotland Ave. has four business districts: way out there (Whitehall-Krumkill – Stewarts, Russian gasoline), mid-town (Manning-West Lawrence – post office, bank, booze, RX, etc.) lower (Ontario-Quail – gas, bank, Stewarts, barber, booze), and lower-lower (Holland-Madison Ave. – banks, RX, eats, booze).

The first two will be addressed as part of the New Scotland Ave. Corridor Study. Lower-lower is in a state of constant flux because of the unending Albany Medical Center Hospital and residential building spree.

The Changes – The lower district (Ontario-Quail) is the “walkable neighborhood” section with several dining establishments, ice cream, banking, etc. It is currently being rebuilt to provide pedestrian-friendly sidewalks, space for patio tables for the restaurants, and notably an effort to rationalize the New Scotland Ave. – Quail St. intersection. There are now “bumpouts” on both sides of Quail. They may encourage people in cars to slow down (we hope) and to enter and leave New Scotland Ave. at a closer to a 90-degree angle. This is opposed to the swooping turns previously favored by the City of Albany’s street designers (e.g., Willet and Madison Ave., New Scotland Ave. and Krumkill, New Scotland Ave. and Buckingham/Lenox, New Scotland Ave. and Euclid, and, Lark St. and Madison Ave.).

The walk area curb-to-curb across Quail St. is now 61 feet. The visual width for people in cars coming south on Quail is somewhat less at around 45 ft due to the bumpouts. Back from the crossing, the street is about 32 ft wide with some parking and two motor vehicle travel lanes. Once the lane markings are in, we’ll have a better idea on the impact on people in cars, on busses, on foot, and on bicycles.

Photos:

  1. Bump out on east side of Quail
  2. Bump out on west side of Quail
  3. New intersection layout viewed from New Scotland Ave.
  4. New intersection from New Scotland Ave. – looks plenty wide and a little scary for people walking. Is it better?
  5. The sprint zone – 61 feet across.
  6. Looking west on New Scotland Ave. with new sidewalk configuration. Once parking is added, looks like bicycle lanes will be impossible.

++++++

Leave a comment

Filed under City Review, Road Diet - Traffic Calming

South End Ride-Walk Honoring Qazir Sutherland

This 3rd annual community event was held on Saturday, September 29 at the Ezra Prentice Homes on. Pearl St. This is one of the least safe streets in the City of Albany with a constant stream of high-speed cars and heavy trucks.

See Channel 10 Video here

There were opening remarks followed by a walk with about 25 participants and some Albany Police Department e-bicycle-mounted escorts along S. Pearl St. to the Helderberg Hudson Rail Trail. Other activities included DJ Supreme, fresh fruits, healthy living tips, a Y-infor table, and a Capital District Transportation Committee safety and trails exhibit. Walk partners included Qazir Sutherland’s Family, A Village, Capital District YMCA, Albany Housing Authority, the City of Albany, Albany County Department of Health, Albany Police Department, and Capital Roots with media support from the Albany Bicycle Coalition.

What better way to relax after a morning of community organizing than a cinnamon bun and coffee at the 3 Fish Café?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Leave a comment

Filed under Activism, City Review, South End Bike Link

Mayor Sheehan Ride to Work Day

Friday, 5/18, 8:00 AM – Mayor Sheehan Ride to Work Day – A group of riders, guarded by a phalanx of Albany Police Department Bicycle Officers, joined Mayor Sheehan for a “ride to work.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe commute began at 8 AM at the corner of Ontario St. and Clinton Ave. (across from Albany Fire Department #7) and went down Albany’s paramount bicycle lanes on Clinton Ave. and then go right on Broadway to Stacks Espresso Bar, where  Mayor Sheehan generously treated us to coffee, tea, and other beverages.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The Mayor and several others road CDPHP Cycle! BikeShare bicycles – a great way to promote the service that features 40 racks in the City of Albany and with 160 new bicycles slated for installation in June.

 

 

 

Plan  your own ride around the city at https://bikealbanymap.com/

For other bicycle events, go here – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/resources/events/

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Bike Lanes, City Review, Rides

6-Mile Park Trail – Signage

Albany Bicycle Coalition, Inc.
127 S. Pine Ave.
Albany, NY 12208
April 9, 2018

RE: Signage at the 6-Mile Park Multiuse Path

Daniel Mirabile,Commissioner, Department of General Services

Joseph E. Coffey, Jr., PE, Commissioner, Albany Department of Water and Water Supply

Dear Commissioners:

This is to ask that you coordinate on installing wayfinding signage at the two entrances to the “6-Mile Park Multiuse Path.”

The multiuse path/bikeway – connecting the 6-Mile Park with Rapp Rd. at the Solid Waste Management Facility – needs signage to direct users to the path. The route is for recreation by people on bicycles and walking. It is a critical “low stress” bicycle connector between the city and Central Ave. with connections to Sand Creek Rd. and beyond. This avoids the death-defying portion of Central Ave. around I-87 and the shopping mall complex on Central Ave./Wolf Rd. We also suggest adding signage to direct both walkers and cyclists to the University at Albany “Purple Path” and the connection to it along the “nano complex” on Fuller Rd.

The Capital District Transportation Committee staff can advise on the style of signage that will be compatible with the overall trail network in the four-county region as well as with the developing Empire State Trail. You could do the requested work with in-house resources on an “as-time-permits” basis.

We in the Albany Bicycle Coalition would be pleased to meet with you or staff to include site visits to explain better our objectives for enhancing the value of the 6-Mile Multiuse Path.

Special Notes:

  • DGS: In addition to wayfinding signage, we suggest warning signs on both the trail and the Rapp Rd. facility entrance to alert people to the heavy truck traffic.
  • WATER AND WATER SUPPLY: We suggest a modifying the paved entry road lying between the park and Washington Ave. Extension and which joins to the lake path at the maintenance building. Pedestrian and bicycle access can be made without defeating the motor vehicle lift gate barrier. You should perhaps change the gate sign from “posted” to “no unauthorized motor vehicles beyond this point.” A little cleanup of the path to the south of the gatepost would also help.

cc:

  • Kathy M. Sheehan, Mayor City of Albany
  • Michael V. Franchini, Executive Director Capital District Transportation Committee
  • Daniel W. DiLillo, Deputy Commissioner – DGS

Photos: Entrance to trail at Rapp Rd., Gate on access road from Fuller Rd., paved access path around gate (two views)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Leave a comment

Filed under Activisim, City Review, Fuller Rd., Trail Network