Category Archives: Bike Lanes

Bicycle Lanes in the City of Albany

As part of the Northern Blvd.-Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lane network, an additional 0.3 miles of buffered lanes are now open on Shaker Rd. (It’s “Albany-Shaker Rd.” in the Town of Colonie and “Shaker Rd.” in Albany.)

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The 6 ft. lanes have a 3-ft painted buffer. These facilitate the ride down (or up) the hill by Memorial Hospital to and from Broadway. The lanes also should reduce petrovehicles speeds on this busy route. Eventually the lanes will continue the additional 0.5 miles to Broadway.

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Below is an inventory of installed bicycle lanes in the City of Albany. Please report any change/corrections to lorenzworden@gmail.com

Madison Ave.

  • Partridge St. – Allen St.     0.4 (2016 completion, no buffer)
  • Partridge St. – Willet St.     0.9 (2018 completion, no buffer)
  •            SUBTOTAL               1.4 (measurement error – Total = 1.4)

 

  • Clinton Ave.                       1.7 (Manning Sq. to Ten Broeck St., no buffer)
  • Northern Blvd.                  0.9 (McCrossin Ave./Pennsylvania Ave. to Van Rensselaer. no buffer)
  • Ten Broeck St.                   0.2 (Clinton Ave. to Livingston Ave., no buffer)
  • Albany-Shaker Rd.           0.3 (Northern Blvd. to Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 (2019 completion, buffered))
  •             SUBTOTAL           3.1

 TOTAL (installed)   4.5 (2019)

 Bicycle Network – The bicycle lane-to-lane connections are as follows:

  • Ten Broeck Ave. and Clinton Ave. – Total mileage of 1.7 + 0.2 = 1.9 mi.
  • Northern Blvd. and Albany-Shaker Rd. – Total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 = 1.2 mi. (This also ties in directly to the 1.5 miles of Van Rensselaer/Rt. 377 bicycle lanes which are mostly in Menands (for a total mileage of 0.9 + 0.3 + 1.5 = 2.7 mi. See – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/2017/07/08/89398/ )

The Madison Ave. bicycle lanes are isolated.

Albany Bicycle Master Plan – The City of Albany approved its Bicycle Master Plan in December 2009. It called for a 20-year completion period as follows: “This bicycle master plan identifies a bikeway network to be phased in over the next 20 years,” (SOURCE: Pg. ES3, https://albany2030.org/files/City%20of%20Albany%20Bicycle%20Master%20Plan.pdf ) In the first 10 years, the city installed 4.5 miles of bicycle lanes for an average of 0.45 per year. At this rate, the City of Albany will have 9.0 miles of bicycle lanes at the end of the 20-years.

By comparison, the City of Troy’s Uncle Sam Trail is 6.3 miles in a combination of shared lanes, cycle tracks, bicycle lanes, and off-road multiuse paths. Troy plans to close the 0.8-mile gap for the “Hudson River Promenade,” now under construction, in 2021.

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Troy Welcomes People on Bicycles

Troy Bike Faclities 6-20-18 (5)Troy Bike Faclities 6-20-18 (1)

Troy Bike Faclities 6-20-18 (3)Troy Bike Faclities 6-20-18 (2)

Troy Bike Faclities 6-20-18 (4)

 

 

 

 

 

Photos courtesy of Bert

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Mayor Sheehan Ride to Work Day

Friday, 5/18, 8:00 AM – Mayor Sheehan Ride to Work Day – A group of riders, guarded by a phalanx of Albany Police Department Bicycle Officers, joined Mayor Sheehan for a “ride to work.”

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe commute began at 8 AM at the corner of Ontario St. and Clinton Ave. (across from Albany Fire Department #7) and went down Albany’s paramount bicycle lanes on Clinton Ave. and then go right on Broadway to Stacks Espresso Bar, where  Mayor Sheehan generously treated us to coffee, tea, and other beverages.

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The Mayor and several others road CDPHP Cycle! BikeShare bicycles – a great way to promote the service that features 40 racks in the City of Albany and with 160 new bicycles slated for installation in June.

 

 

 

Plan  your own ride around the city at https://bikealbanymap.com/

For other bicycle events, go here – https://albanybicyclecoalition.com/resources/events/

 

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Toward Better Connections in Troy

An enthusiastic audience came to the interesting Tech Valley Center of Gravity facility to learn all about the big plans to build new bicycle routes and to connect up those that already exist.

The City of Troy, the Capital District Transportation Committee, and Parks & Trails NY held a public meeting on 11/8/17 to give an overview of the “Troy Trail Connections Plan.”  Mayor Madden opened the meeting with a statement of commitment by the city to move forward as rapidly as possible to make Troy a bike-able city.  The project director from CDTC wisely provided a brief overview of the nature of her organization and its mission in Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga and Schenectady counties – something that is a mystery to many.   We then got down to business with a presentation by the Executive Director and Project Leader from PTNY.

To comment on the plan, go to – http://troytrailconnections.weebly.com/draft-plan.html

Those who were on this Fall’s Collar City Ramble will recall the “pop up” bicycle facilities planned and installed by PTNY and the city.  (We should also recall he Mayor and Mrs. Madden road the Ramble – a good example for other local officials.)

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Engaged!

 

 

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Presenting the BIG Plan

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Full Road Diet for Delaware Ave. – Elsmere Ave. to the Normanskill Bridge

[Ed Note – Two letters were sent to the Town of Bethlehem]

ABC Logo SMALL 2011#1 – 10/17/17

Mr. Robert Leslie

Director of Planning

Town of Bethlehem

Dear Mr. Leslie:

I am writing on behalf of the Albany Bicycle Coalition in support of the Full Road Diet proposal for Delaware Avenue from Elsmere Avenue to the Normanskill Bridge.  The Albany Bicycle Coalition promotes cycling and cycling safety throughout the Capital Region.  We have reviewed the Delaware Avenue Complete Streets Feasibility Study and several of our members were able to attend the recent presentations. We are familiar with this busy section of road as both cyclists and drivers.

The lack of bike lanes, narrow shoulders (if any) and the speed of cars make cycling on this section of Delaware Avenue especially hazardous. The four lanes of traffic make the road difficult to cross except in the two widely separated places that have crosswalks. We agree that slower speeds, two motor vehicle traffic lanes with a turning lane and bike lanes will vastly improve the safety and appeal of this area.

One especially bothersome complaint opposing the plan is that walkers and cyclists have the new and popular Albany County Helderberg Hudson Rail Trail so should not need bike lanes and pedestrian improvements on Delaware Avenue.  Pedestrians and cyclists are not just participating in these activities for the sake of walking or cycling.  They are going somewhere. There should be a safe way to walk and cycle to the many businesses and other destinations along the Delaware Avenue corridor.  People in cars are not “giving up something” for people on busses, on foot or on bicycles – these latter groups are merely demanding their fair and proper share of the road space.  Improving and increasing foot and bike traffic is not only good for pedestrians and cyclists, it is good for businesses and good for building an appealing community.

It is also important to remember that for many Delaware Avenue is the only practical connection between Albany and the southwest communities of Delmar and Elsmere.  The rail trail has no designated access between Elsmere and South Pearl Street in Albany.  For walkers and cyclists wanting to go anywhere in between the rail trail is not a solution.  Delaware Avenue is the only route for many people that commute to work by bicycle and for many people that commute by bus who must then walk from bus stops to their destinations.  These people must be able to get to and from work safely.

Lastly, if the success of the Rail Trail has shown anything, it has shown how so many people in this community want to get out of their cars to walk and bicycle.  While the rail trail is a safe place to walk and bicycle, it is hazardous to get to the Rail Trail if your route follows Delaware Avenue.  We urge the Town Board to approve the Full Road Diet plan and to see that this plan is carried out without delay.

Thank you for your efforts and consideration.

Sincerely,

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#2 – 10/24/17

Dear Mr. Leslie,

As a member of the Albany Bicycle Coalition. I am writing to express my support of the Full Road Diet proposal for Delaware Avenue from Elsmere Avenue to the Normanskill Bridge. I have biked on Delaware Ave and am  familiar with this busy section of road as both a cyclist and driver.

The lack of bike lanes, narrow shoulders (if any) and the speed of cars make cycling on this section of Delaware Avenue especially hazardous. The four lanes of traffic make the road difficult to cross except in the two widely separated places that have crosswalks.  Lower speeds, two motor vehicle traffic lanes with a turning lane and bike lanes will vastly improve the safety and appeal of this area.

An invalid complaint by those opposing the plan is that walkers and cyclists have the new and popular Albany County Helderberg Hudson Rail Trail so they should not need bike lanes and pedestrian improvements on Delaware Avenue.  Pedestrians and cyclists are not just participating in these activities for the sake of walking or cycling.  They are going somewhere. There should be a safe way to walk and cycle to the many businesses and other destinations along the Delaware Avenue corridor.

The Rail Trail has shown that many people want to get out of their cars to walk and bicycle.  While the rail trail is a safe place to walk and bicycle, it is hazardous to get to the Rail Trail if your route follows Delaware Avenue.  I urge the Town Board to approve the Full Road Diet plan and to see that this plan is carried out without delay.

Thank you for your time and attention.

Sincerely,

Albany Bicycle Coalition

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